Review: Encounters With Star People by Ardy Sixkiller Clarke

Encounters with Star People gives the UFO phenomenon a fresh new treatment, focusing exclusively on the experiences of modern American Indian people. Author Ardy Sixkiller Clarke, herself of Indian heritage, has personally collected and curated these stories. They are all presented here for the first time, having previously been held in strict confidence, known only to the experiencers, or other close members of their communities.

The 20-plus chapters each introduce a separate story, most of which focus on one or two specific individuals being interviewed by the author. She relates her experiences with each unique personality, and manages to portray a lot of character in her contacts in a relatively short amount of space. The nature of the events documented ranges from basic sightings of unidentified craft to alien encounters and abductions.

The skeptical reader will likely take solace in pointing out the myriad minor (or major) inconsistencies between the experiences related here. Inexplicable variation tends to be the rule in ufology, and the same apparently holds true within this community. Despite this, viewing the breadth of these accounts through the lens of a shared culture gives the whole thing a rather unique air of consistency. The believer may even find that the stories aren’t quite so wildly inconsistent after all, and that there seem to be at least a few themes which appear to underlie these otherwise independent events. It’s worth noting that some of the book’s later accounts take on a decidedly dark tone, and I admit to finding the cumulative effect of so many, not entirely dissimilar, experiences a bit disturbing.

My one substantial complaint with Encounters with Star People is that all accounts have been made anonymous. This is a point the author is very clear about, and we’re told, rather understandably, that it was a hard and fast condition of being able to publish much of the information she was given. I certainly understand why someone would desire not to be openly associated with fringe topics which could easily be used to threaten their job, relationships, or general quality of life. Having said that, as a reader one is forced to recognize that an anonymous account is also an unverifiable account, and as such provides zero evidentiary value. Some of the stories here are fantastic, but for the skeptically minded, they may as well be out right fiction. Assuming many of the items here are true, at least in some quantity – as human experiences if nothing else – then it’s a shame that such great material will likely be diminished and overlooked for the lack of a name. Even just one such story, backed up by confirmed and credible sources, might carry more weight than dozens that can never be traced beyond these pages.

With that in mind, if you can look past the anonymity and appreciate the material at face value, then Encounters with Star People is undoubtedly a ufological gold mine. Dr. Clarke should be commended for the effort she has put into this research over the years, and for bringing the culture of the star people to the general public. This work has added more new reports to the canon of ufology than possibly any other in recent years, if not decades. At times amusing, confusing, and even alarming, it was a hard book to put down.

 

Rating: 4/5

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